Cats, Dogs, And Politician Control

A social commentary on the lack of animal control in Stevens County and a shocking prevailing attitude.

My heart breaks when I look at the picture above of the feral cat we caught on our property night before last. Our goal was to take it in to animal control to have it fixed and/or relocated to a better place such as a barn cat type of situation. Here, it is just hungry, cold and gets into fights with our fixed house cats.

We should have done our homework before we trapped it as we discovered there are no animal control services in Stevens County – for cats, at least. They have limited services for dogs but cats – forget it. Thank God there are some non-profits in the area that are filling the vacuum.

What is wrong with the local officials that they are ignoring this problem? Could it be money? The culture? Whatever it is, it’s bullshit and it pisses me off badly. There is a problem because there are no services. Ignore it and it will get worse!

I looked up animal control in the Revised Code Washington and in black and white there it was; there is no requirement for a jurisdiction to have services set up for animal control. Wow.

Once we had kitty, we made some calls and got the runaround. Animal control referred us to the sanctuary but they are closed for a few days (bad timing for us), and the Stevens County Sheriff who told us they don’t offer any services referred us to Spokane County’s SCRAPS program. We drove eighty miles only to find they didn’t accept out-of-county cats.

That’s when I posted on Facebook.

There I learned a little about the local attitude: dump ’em in another town or take care of things the – you know – old fashioned way.  I’m not going to give that disgusting option any words on this page.  One person mentioned that they’d heard cats taste like chicken. What kind of human being could say something like that? Answer: it wasn’t a human – it was a pig.

After the SCRAPS program turned us away, we drove home with kitty and let it go for the time being. Luckily, there are people here who have evolved past the Crow-Magnon stage of evolution and with their help, there is a plan in place to re-capture kitty and find a good home for it.

I’d like to re-home a few politicians while we’re at it – oh – and take care of couple of assholes on Facebook – you know – the old fashioned way.

I’m joking, of course.

Author: ldinlove

I live with my family, two cats, and at any given moment: ten dear, two turkeys, ten chicks, ten billion ants, ten thousand bees and wasps, two white rabbits, twenty angry squirrels, one occasional bear ( occasional works for me), a couple of snakes, the neighbor's stray dogs, and one very friendly skunk.

4 thoughts on “Cats, Dogs, And Politician Control”

  1. J > It’s similar here in the UK. Legally, dogs are property and owners therefore have rights of ownership but also responsibilities. Stray or abandoned dogs are a problem because they form packs which could attack and kill livestock or even children. Cat’s, legally, are wild creatures, and they’re considered to pose dangers to society so the law and government don’t interest themselves, other than requiring someone in possession of cat (like any other animal) to treat it humanely, not cruelly, and to attend to its needs. Thankfully, we have a lot of well-fundedvoluntary organisations that are very pro-active. That said, here in the islands, the indigenous islanders don’t have much interest in pets, and cats are feral cats are tolerated (but rarely provided with food or shelter) because they catch vermin. These cats are never allowed indoors : our neighbour thinks it very strange, at our house, to have a cat sitting next to him, ‘talking’ to him and wanting to be stroked. We have four cats, currently, all rescue cats, and they are very well cared for – and still good rat and mouse hunters!

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