The Newest Neighbors

Learning to live with other humans again.

We lost out in the great land rush. That is, we weren’t able to buy either¬†of the adjacent lots to our property.

Our parcel was originally part of one large parcel which was divided into four but we got the best one. About a year after we moved in, we made an offer on the upper lot but we didn’t have enough of a down payment.

Then someone else got it.

There still remained hope that we’d get the lower two lots which had been combined to sell as one but as of last week, it was sold.

How did we find out? We woke up one morning to see a strange truck parked across from our entrance.

We were dismayed. For the last year, we’ve had the entire place to ourselves. My husband could walk outside and whip it out to pee with immunity and privacy.

No more. Those days are gone forever, or until we put up a fence. You see, we’re intensely private people and the newest neighbors might as well have come up to our doorstep and set up a tent and a picnic table.

We almost feel violated.

We’d met the newest neighbors previously when they were just looking but now they’re “setting up shop” right across the cul-de-sac from us. They have no right to do that! That’s their land after all. Wait – I guess they do have the right to do that – but why there, so close?

At least the neighbors from hell with the fifty dogs didn’t buy it. They tried, and to look on the bright side, maybe the newbies can help plow the half mile long driveway in the winter?

Now we have to live with real people again, like in the burbs. But we’ve forgotten how. We’d previously lived in a neighborhood with an HOA from hell and fifty feet between houses. We moved to get away¬†from that.

As the day wore on, we snooped on our new friends by looking out of a peeled-down corner of our bubble wrapped windows. We watched as they brought up a wood chipper and began to cut up trees around their truck and mow their grass. How annoying. We’re the only ones allowed to do that.

With a sense of culture shock, we realized they are there to stay and that we’ll have to build that fence or get used to them.

It’s amazing how you gain a sense of ownership over land that doesn’t belong to you and when somebody who comes along and buys it fair and square, you feel a sense of being invaded.

I hope we can adapt.